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Tagged: workforce

10 Examples of Employee Engagement in Action

March 9, 2016

The ongoing cycle of customer experience success is comprised of four main influencers: Employees, Customers, Management, and Data. In this series, CSP examines the Employee segment of that cycle and the benefits of focusing on internal culture to drive success.

One of the main advantages of measuring employee engagement is the ability to take something intangible – sense of purpose, satisfaction, and commitment – and turn it into solid data. With this knowledge, businesses can pave a way forward, continuing to rely on regularly updated data to evaluate progress and adjust as necessary.

The Psychology of Engagement

Abraham Maslow’s “Hierarchy of Needs” is a staple of human developmental psychology.

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

This breakdown of basic, universal human needs provides a useful framework for understanding employee engagement. Let’s take a look at some examples of the key drivers of employee satisfaction, how they correlate with different needs, and what they look like in action (or absence).

Key Driver of Engagement Satisfies This Need Effect on Employee Performance
“My work space is comfortable, and I have the tools and resources I need.” Physiological
  • When this need is met, employees look forward to coming to work and can perform more productively.
  • When this need is not met, employees may dread their time at work and not accomplish as much each day.
“I am fairly compensated with salary and benefits.” Physiological
Esteem
  • When this need is met, employees are likely to remain committed to the company and don’t feel taken advantage of.
  • When this need is not met, employees may become suspicious of or competitive with each other, or begin looking for other employment.
“I feel confident in my job security with this company.” Safety
  • When this need is met, employees can relax and bring their best effort to their jobs, knowing they will still be there tomorrow.
  • When this need is not met, employees may be paranoid, insecure, and less devoted to doing their best.
“I can bring up concerns and ideas to my supervisors” Safety
Esteem
  • When this need is met, employees trust management to be open to their ideas, suggestions, and even criticism.
  • When this need is not met, employees may hesitate to be proactive, contribute solutions, or bring attention to problem areas for fear that it could backfire on them.
“I feel well-informed by what is going on at this company.” Belonging
Esteem
  • When this need is met, employees feel they are connected to the big picture and are motivated to work towards common goals.
  • When this need is not met, employees may become distrustful or disillusioned, and performance can suffer because they “don’t see the point” of their jobs.
“There is a strong sense of teamwork here.” Belonging
  • When this need is met, employees communicate well with each other and with management, and inter-office conflict is kept to a minimum and handled effectively.
  • When this need is not met, tensions can rise between team members or management, and productivity takes a backseat to conflict resolution.
“This company recognizes and rewards people who are doing their jobs well.” Esteem
Belonging
  • When this need is met, employees strive to earn the company’s recognition and are supportive of their team members who do the same.
  • When this need is not met – or if it is met unfairly, such as favoritism – employees may become less productive or unhealthily competitive with one another.
“This company is highly respected in the industry and/or by the public.” Esteem
  • When this need is met, employees take pride in their work and in their roles in supporting the company’s success.
  • When this need is not met, employees may feel ashamed or embarrassed to say that they work for this company, and possibly seek out positions with better-regarded employers.
“I feel empowered to make decisions on my own.” Self-actualization
  • When this need is met, problems and situations are handled effectively, swiftly, and with the least amount of drama.
  • When this need is not met, the employee feels – and acts – as though their hands are literally tied, and productivity suffers because they are always waiting for someone else to act first.
“There is a clear path for promotion or growth from my current position.” Self-actualization
Safety
  • When this need is met, employees draw extra motivation from the possibility of advancement and seek to impress management by proving their worth.
  • When this need is not met, employees may feel underappreciated or stifled, and are open to other opportunities with more promise.
These are just a handful of more than 40 attributes CSP considers when guiding our clients to improve employee engagement.

While no single area of need is more important than all of the others, all of these needs are interrelated and depend on each other to promote optimal employee engagement. The most influential drivers of engagement will vary from workplace to workplace, depending on factors like staff demographics, fluctuations in the economy, and change within the company. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to nurturing engagement. It must be measured and addressed on a case-by-case basis to produce results.


 

More posts on internal culture and employee engagement:

 

Know the Differences between Employee Training and Coaching

March 25, 2015

Training and coaching sound like they could refer to the same thing: imparting information that someone else—in this case, your employees—can learn from.

In fact, training and coaching each serve a distinct purpose to your organization and can’t be interchanged. Knowing the differences between the two, and how and when to deploy them, is the key to affecting employee performance and satisfaction.

Training

training
Goals
  • Orient new employees to workplace standards and practices
  • Impart a specific new skill (e.g., using new software)
  • Instruct many employees at once with the same level of information
Setting
  • Often offered as a group lesson or course, sometimes digitally
  • May be a one-time session or a series of sessions
  • Few opportunities for one-on-one attention
Content
  • Standardized lessons delivered to all employees the same way
  • Content may be proprietary, owned by either the company or a third-party vendor brought in for training
Methods
  • Top-down, classroom-style teaching from one or more instructors
  • Worksheets, workbooks, handouts, or required reading
  • Activities, presentations, or projects, individual or grouped
  • May culminate with a test and/or certificate of completion

Training is best suited to new material or with new employees. Its purpose is to introduce a concept or skill and give the employee a basic proficiency with that topic, which they will then take into practice on the job. Training is often a one-time commitment per topic, rather than an ongoing process.

Coaching

coaching
Goals
  • Encourage employee development and improved performance
  • Address specific problem areas with specific employees (vs. a group)
  • Less about “how to” and more about “how well”
Setting
  • Most often occurs one-on-one, though one coach may manage more than one employee
  • Less structured than training; scheduled and delivered as needed
  • ·An ongoing process that follows the employee’s own progress
Content
  • Customized to the employee’s needs and learning curve
  • Hands-on opportunities to learn and practice, sometimes on the job
  • Worksheets and handouts less common, but coach may recommend additional material for continued learning
  • May be tied to employee performance reviews
Methods
  • Bottom-up approach built on the employee’s needs and questions
  • Encourages employee to examine and reflect on his/her own development and take constructive critique
  • Deliberate focus on specific areas of improvement, with benchmarks and goals for measuring progress

While training is skills-oriented, the purpose of coaching is to develop talent. We’ve written before that there is no such thing as one-size-fits-all training; coaching allows instructors and employees to identify and address the specific issues that training may have missed. It’s also easier to accommodate different learning styles with a more personalized approach.

Why Training & Coaching Are Essential

Training aims to establish a well-informed, high-performing workforce. Coaching works to maintain it. If employees are recurrently falling below expectations, stagnating in their progress towards their goals, or failing to grasp the skills and talents you’re trying to impart on them, the problem might lie in how they are being trained, and what kind of coaching they are (or aren’t) receiving to reinforce that training.

Together, training and coaching benefit both employees and customers. Solid training and coaching support a smooth, stable working environment and improve morale and overall performance. That trickles down to the customer experience – customers know they can rely on the quality of service they’ll get from anyone they may talk to at the company.

Customer feedback also trickles back up into educational efforts, revealing any problem areas in service that need to be addressed on an institutional level.

That’s why CSP builds in plenty of overlap between the customer research and training/coaching components of our customer experience management programs. A superior experience depends on consistent alignment at every level of the organization. If you could use a fresh perspective on effective employee education, we welcome your questions.

For more information about how CSP supports employee & customer engagement, contact us today by phone at (402) 399-8790 ext:101, via our website, or on Twitter @csprofiles

Use Learning Styles to Customize Your Employee Training

January 28, 2015

As we’ve stated in a previous post, there is no such thing as one-size-fits-all employee training.

There are actually two layers of truth to that assertion. Not only should each business customize its training program to best meet the expectations and needs of its customers, each employee has distinct learning preferences. These preferences will affect the employees’ ability to absorb the material.

Understanding learning styles will help you conduct the most effective training that gets through to each individual and sticks. Each learning style has its own strengths and weaknesses.

visual learning stylesVisual

Visual learners want to see the information or idea that’s being conveyed to them. They like graphs and diagrams and may color-code their notes and materials. They can learn a new task by watching someone else do it.

Strengths

  • Can visualize ideas in detail
  • Does well in face-to-face environments
  • Learns well from descriptive examples and demonstrations, pictures, or diagrams
  • Good note-takers and list-makers

Challenges

  • Can get distracted by clutter, movement, or crowds
  • Might struggle to listen for long periods of time
  • Less likely to retain what they hear

auditory learning stylesAuditory

Auditory learners want to hear the information. Mnemonic devices and rhymes make intuitive sense to these students, and they have no problem paying attention to a long presentation – they may even quote the speaker later on from memory. They can learn a new task if it’s described well to them.

Strengths:

  • Attentive listeners and communicators with a good memory for what is said, with or without note-taking
  • Does well on the phone
  • Absorbs verbal/written instructions

Challenges:

  • Sensitive to a noisy or loud environment
  • May find handouts during presentations to be more distracting than helpful
  • May need to hear instructions repeatedly to fully grasp them

kinesthetic learning stylesKinesthetic

Kinesthetic learners want to do it themselves. They are hands-on students who often rely on muscle memory and “feeling” their way through things. If teaching others, they’d rather demonstrate than explain.

Strengths:

  • Learns well with plenty of practice
  • Can figure things out as they go along
  • Thrives in in-person learning environments

Challenges:

  • Prefers a peaceful learning environment without a lot of active movement around them
  • Less likely to pay attention to verbal or written instructions
  • Unlikely to study from notes
  • Can feel trapped or restless in a classroom or at a desk for prolonged periods

Most adults won’t fall 100% into one box, but could have a secondary learning style that compliments their dominant preference. There are simple activities you can have your team complete to identify their learning styles.

Training for the Different Learning Styles

A slideshow presentation delivered by a single speaker may engage the visual and auditory learners, but leave the kinesthetic learners bored. They’d prefer a class with lots of activities and opportunities to practice, but the visual and auditory learners may then fall behind without as much verbal information.

When designing your training curriculum, make it a priority to include activities and methods that engage all three styles. Show, tell, and do. Pay attention to what seems to be working for your own group – after all, if the team skews towards visual learners, the learning materials might as well follow suit.

Effective employee training can have an indirect impact on the customer experience. You want skilled representatives on the front lines of customer service – and you get skilled representatives by taking their learning styles into consideration.

Want to know more about customized training solutions designed with the customer experience in mind? Contact CSP today.

Welcoming the Era of the Universal Banker

January 14, 2015

Innovations in mobile and digital platforms have influenced significant paradigm changes in how bank and credit union customers interact with their institutions in the virtual space. Now that wave of change is bleeding over into the physical world, with the invention and adoption of the universal banker.

The future and function of the brick-and-mortar branch continues to be a subject of debate, especially as digital solutions have taken their toll on teller transactions and branch foot traffic. Universal bankers are one response to this, with the potential to not only affect the customer experience, but address some of the challenges of staffing and workforce management across bank networks.

The title “Universal Banker” first started catching the industry’s attention in 2015. That year, BAI named increased implementation of universal bankers as one of the most anticipated trends in retail banking. Job listings seeking universal bankers spread rapidly across online platforms among banks big and small.

What is a universal banker?
universal banker

In a nutshell, the universal banker role is a hybrid of the traditional teller and the personal banker. Their specialty is being unspecialized – or, maybe more accurately, specializing in everything – and they can be found everywhere on the sales floor, rather than chained to a desk or booth.

Universal bankers take staff roles out of their silos to function across multiple tasks: basic transactions, new accounts, loan applications, and general customer service, to name a few. The degree of universal function will likely vary from bank to bank, but cross-training is the common theme.

How does a universal banker make a difference to customers?

No one likes being given the run-around, whether it’s for a simple transaction or a more complex situation. Handing off a customer from one specialized-but-limited employee to another is not only frustrating for the customer, but has implications for productivity and resource utilization behind the desk.

Universal bankers can handle a customer request from start to finish. Certain sensitive or complex tasks, like mortgages and business loans, may eventually require involving someone higher up the chain, but the average customer can expect a universal banker to take them all the way through the interaction.

In a way, you might consider the universal banker as an accessible middle ground between the convenience and flexibility of automation and the nuance and additional context of personal customer service.

What are some of the challenges of introducing the universal banker?

The universal banker may be agile and adaptable, but that doesn’t mean this model will be appropriate to every institution and every branch.

Implementing universal bankers is not a silver bullet to increase branch traffic, but rather serves to better meet the needs of those customers already coming through those doors. Banks considering this model will need to closely examine just how appropriate it is for each branch.

The other major hurdle is getting employee buy-in. The daily routine at the branch may not be so routine anymore. Training programs and resources will need to be updated, most likely on an ongoing basis, to accommodate this role and its demands. Some long-standing employees may feel threatened by this new breed of coworker.

This isn’t just another position at the bank; it’s a paradigm shift within both customer experience and employee qualifications. The implications for the internal culture cannot be downplayed or dismissed.

What will be the impact of universal bankers?

As banks begin experimenting with universal bankers, ongoing measurement of their internal and external impact will be critical.

That’s why this new trend in retail banking interests us at CSP – we’re passionate about improving the customer experience, and the first step to that improvement is measurement. Voice of the Customer programs like ours can be customized and optimized to capture insights into the effectiveness of universal bankers.

For more information on our VoC and Customer Intelligence solutions, explore our website or contact us. You can also follow us on Twitter@csprofiles – for regular updates and insights on customer experience management.