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Tagged: satisfaction

10 Examples of Employee Engagement in Action

March 9, 2016

The ongoing cycle of customer experience success is comprised of four main influencers: Employees, Customers, Management, and Data. In this series, CSP examines the Employee segment of that cycle and the benefits of focusing on internal culture to drive success.

One of the main advantages of measuring employee engagement is the ability to take something intangible – sense of purpose, satisfaction, and commitment – and turn it into solid data. With this knowledge, businesses can pave a way forward, continuing to rely on regularly updated data to evaluate progress and adjust as necessary.

The Psychology of Engagement

Abraham Maslow’s “Hierarchy of Needs” is a staple of human developmental psychology.

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

This breakdown of basic, universal human needs provides a useful framework for understanding employee engagement. Let’s take a look at some examples of the key drivers of employee satisfaction, how they correlate with different needs, and what they look like in action (or absence).

Key Driver of Engagement Satisfies This Need Effect on Employee Performance
“My work space is comfortable, and I have the tools and resources I need.” Physiological
  • When this need is met, employees look forward to coming to work and can perform more productively.
  • When this need is not met, employees may dread their time at work and not accomplish as much each day.
“I am fairly compensated with salary and benefits.” Physiological
Esteem
  • When this need is met, employees are likely to remain committed to the company and don’t feel taken advantage of.
  • When this need is not met, employees may become suspicious of or competitive with each other, or begin looking for other employment.
“I feel confident in my job security with this company.” Safety
  • When this need is met, employees can relax and bring their best effort to their jobs, knowing they will still be there tomorrow.
  • When this need is not met, employees may be paranoid, insecure, and less devoted to doing their best.
“I can bring up concerns and ideas to my supervisors” Safety
Esteem
  • When this need is met, employees trust management to be open to their ideas, suggestions, and even criticism.
  • When this need is not met, employees may hesitate to be proactive, contribute solutions, or bring attention to problem areas for fear that it could backfire on them.
“I feel well-informed by what is going on at this company.” Belonging
Esteem
  • When this need is met, employees feel they are connected to the big picture and are motivated to work towards common goals.
  • When this need is not met, employees may become distrustful or disillusioned, and performance can suffer because they “don’t see the point” of their jobs.
“There is a strong sense of teamwork here.” Belonging
  • When this need is met, employees communicate well with each other and with management, and inter-office conflict is kept to a minimum and handled effectively.
  • When this need is not met, tensions can rise between team members or management, and productivity takes a backseat to conflict resolution.
“This company recognizes and rewards people who are doing their jobs well.” Esteem
Belonging
  • When this need is met, employees strive to earn the company’s recognition and are supportive of their team members who do the same.
  • When this need is not met – or if it is met unfairly, such as favoritism – employees may become less productive or unhealthily competitive with one another.
“This company is highly respected in the industry and/or by the public.” Esteem
  • When this need is met, employees take pride in their work and in their roles in supporting the company’s success.
  • When this need is not met, employees may feel ashamed or embarrassed to say that they work for this company, and possibly seek out positions with better-regarded employers.
“I feel empowered to make decisions on my own.” Self-actualization
  • When this need is met, problems and situations are handled effectively, swiftly, and with the least amount of drama.
  • When this need is not met, the employee feels – and acts – as though their hands are literally tied, and productivity suffers because they are always waiting for someone else to act first.
“There is a clear path for promotion or growth from my current position.” Self-actualization
Safety
  • When this need is met, employees draw extra motivation from the possibility of advancement and seek to impress management by proving their worth.
  • When this need is not met, employees may feel underappreciated or stifled, and are open to other opportunities with more promise.
These are just a handful of more than 40 attributes CSP considers when guiding our clients to improve employee engagement.

While no single area of need is more important than all of the others, all of these needs are interrelated and depend on each other to promote optimal employee engagement. The most influential drivers of engagement will vary from workplace to workplace, depending on factors like staff demographics, fluctuations in the economy, and change within the company. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to nurturing engagement. It must be measured and addressed on a case-by-case basis to produce results.


 

More posts on internal culture and employee engagement:

 

Banks, Don’t Overlook the Business Customer Experience

October 29, 2015

When banks and credit unions look at the topic of customer satisfaction, most likely they are thinking about their consumer customers – students, retirees, and everyone in between. But what about business customers? A new business is started every minute in the U.S., and some predict that over half the labor market will be self-employed by 2020. This creates a huge opportunity for banks to fill these entrepreneurs’ needs.

Banks who want a piece of the small & mid-sized business pie need to devote attention and resources to the business customer experience just as they would to consumers. Business and consumer customers walk through the same door into the same branch, but their journeys, needs, and expectations diverge from there.

What do business banking customers value?

personal-791345_640By and large, the same basic elements apply to both consumer and business banking customers – friendly and competent customer service, product availability and associated fees, etc. — but they look at those elements from different angles.

For example, the availability and quality of mobile and online banking tools are valuable drivers of satisfaction to both consumers and businesses, but they’ll be using them very differently. It’s unlikely that the same portal will meet both of their needs. And while the consumer segment has embraced digital banking readily, small business banking customers still favor visiting a branch to conduct their affairs.

Likewise, a consumer may not be bothered if they interact with different faces each time they perform a transaction as long as the quality is reliable, while business owners are more comfortable with an ongoing, consistent relationship with the same person or team of people. One survey found that small- and mid-sized businesses cited their relationship manager as the most important point of contact with their bank — more important than online banking by a wide margin.

Business owners, especially small businesses and start-ups, don’t just need someone to handle a transaction; they are looking for a partner to help them navigate the complexities of things like payroll, taxes, cash flow, and SBA loans. Consistency helps build and maintain trust, particularly if the business hits a rough patch and needs some flexibility or extra help.

Just like consumers, business customers want to feel understood on an individual and specific level, and want service that’s personalized to them. A later survey by J.D. Power & Associates, referenced here, found that business customers who felt that their relationship manager ‘completely understands’ their business were far more likely to say they’d definitely stick with their bank than those who felt less understood – 47% vs. 19%.

Follow the logic.

The correlation between feeling understood and sticking around as a customer should not come as a surprise. But does that mean banks are going out of the way to deeply understand the needs of their business customers? J.D. Power has found that overall small business banking satisfaction is trending upward in the last five years, with big and mid-size banks eking out a lead over regional and community banks, but there’s still plenty of room for improvement.

To see things from the business owner’s point of view, you might also be interested in this guide from the Wall Street Journal: How to Choose a Bank for Your Business. Using those criteria, do you think a business owner would feel compelled to choose your institution?

CSP specializes in customizing your customer experience to drive satisfaction among your customers, consumer and business alike. If you see room for improvement at your institution, contact us or call (800) 841-7954 ext:101 to start a discussion about your concerns.

Superior Customer Service Requires More than Just ‘Checking the Boxes’

April 1, 2015

You’re doing all the right things. You have a Voice of the Customer program in place. You’re capturing, measuring, and evaluating both customer sentiment and employee performance. Your customer-facing staff is vetted and well trained. A superior customer experience is a priority at all levels of your organization.

But when the VOC results come in, there’s still a gap between performance and satisfaction. What’s going on here?

The missing piece of the puzzle could be authenticity.

A satisfying customer service experience hinges on the interaction between the customer and your business. First impressions happen every day and go a long way. So do the little things like using a customer’s name, making sure they are served promptly and efficiently, maintaining a pleasant attitude and tone, making eye contact, and saying Thank You.

These elements make up the basic checklist of Customer Service Do’s and Don’ts. But even if your staff is consistently checking every box on that list, customers can still feel unwelcome, challenged, or dissatisfied with their experience if they sense a lack of authenticity from a representative or from your business as a whole.

It takes more than checking the boxes to win a customer over.

checklist

 

Plainly stated, customers can tell when a business is just going through the motions.

They know, for instance, if the representative they’re speaking with on the phone is just reading from a script or repeating a routine they’ve already performed 100 times that day. The result? They feel unimportant and dehumanized. (This is one reason many customers dislike automated phone systems.)

customer service employee

Customers can tell when your employees are having a bad day.

They can tell when an employee is in a rush – to get home, to serve other customers, to hand them off to the next person in line. The result? They feel like an unwelcome nuisance.

They will pick up on all sorts of little cues like tone of voice, body language, and the level of surrounding stress. If any of those things strike them as being off, it doesn’t matter how many times they heard their name used or made eye contact – their experience has already been negatively impacted, and once that happens, it’s hard to erase.

The same applies for digital and text interactions, too. If you’ve ever written a letter to your Senator only to get a form letter in response, you know how frustrating the “copy/paste” effect can be.

Automation has its place. For example, no one expects every “Forgot password?” request to connect them to someone who can personally help them track it down or reset it.

But it’s still worth being aware that canned messages can convey a different message entirely than the one you want to send. We’re only half-listening to you. We can’t give you our full attention. You are not unique – we have plenty of other customers just like you, and you don’t deserve special treatment.

On the other side of that coin, you have everything to gain by going out of your way to make an authentic, personal connection to a customer – to remember not just their name but something personal about them, to make small talk while you pull their information up on your computer, to pay them a genuine compliment, ask them a question, or offer (if needed) a sincere apology.

Your standard customer service checklist serves as a Pass/Fail measurement of an experience, but authentic effort and personal gestures are the invisible final box that, once checked, pushes an experience from ‘good enough’ to ‘exceptional!’

So if you are seeing a gap between performance and satisfaction in your customer feedback, it may reflect that customers are expecting a little more from you than the bare minimum effort to keep their business. The good news is, this opens an opportunity for growth and innovation in how you meet customers’ needs and provide an outstanding experience.

For more information about CSP’s customer experience strategies and the programs we build to support them, contact us today by phone at (402) 399-8790 ext:101, via our website, or on Twitter @csprofiles

More Than Just a Program, Voice of the Customer is a Promise

February 4, 2015

Instating a Voice of the Customer program to capture customer experience insights has many practical benefits:

  • It takes something vague and subjective, like customer experience, and turns it into quantifiable metrics.
  • It clearly identifies the key drivers of customer satisfaction that are unique to each business and each customer base.
  • It shows trends, progress, and declines over time, allowing you to adapt to changes as you go, and see warning signs ahead of time if something is awry.
  • It plays an informative role in employee training, performance review, and shaping a company’s internal culture.

And that’s just naming a few.

But while all of those reasons are worthwhile, to the customer, they’re just corporate jargon that has little to do with the reality of their lives and their relationships with your business.

Looking at the notion of customer experience from their perspective, Voice of the Customer isn’t a toolbox, it’s a promise.

voice of the customer is a promise

By actively listening to customers, you promise to value their opinions just as much as those of the shareholders or owners who are profiting from their business.

rio bank newsletter voice of the customerThis newsletter produced by Rio Bank for its customers puts that promise front and center by telling customers what steps this Texas institution is taking to look out for their interests, and transparently discloses exactly what goals will be satisfied through Voice of the Customer measurements and initiatives.

Customer loyalty starts with accountability to your promises. Accountability starts with a Voice of the Customer program.

A guarantee to put customers front and center in business decisions can inspire confidence, especially if they see enough direct action to prove they’re not just empty words. It also gives them an invitation to raise their own voices and participate, knowing those voices won’t fall on deaf ears.

While it’s still true that the squeaky wheel tends to get the grease, for any vehicle to move forward, all of the wheels must get enough attention and care to roll along smoothly.

Voice of the Customer keeps the customer-facing side of any business running like a well-oiled machine, lubricating relationships between employees and customers, customers and products, managers and staff.

Are you delivering on your promises? CSP is passionate about improving the customer experience, and can show you how you measure up against your customers’ expectations. Contact us today to find out more.