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Tagged: net promoter score

Why You Need More Than One Metric to Describe Customer Loyalty

August 31, 2016

As a business leader, you know the importance of keeping your finger on the pulse of customer loyalty. A critical part of customer relationship management, customer loyalty goes well beyond a customer making a purchase. Loyalty is steeped in the relationship between the company and purchaser.

A loyal customer believes your organization offers the best option. Loyal customers will purchase a product or service from the same brand, over a long period of time, while turning down competitors, and spreading satisfaction through word of mouth. Loyal customers will stay with you even in trying times. 

Customer loyalty can’t be summed up in a single number.

customer loyalty can't be summed up in a single numberWhile loyalty may appear as a single topic on your priority list, it would be a mistake to try to measure it with just one indicator.

As an example, many businesses looking to improve customer satisfaction use a Net Promoter ScoreSM (NPS®). This system measures the likelihood that customers will recommend a product, service, or company to others, and is often touted as “the only number you need to know.” Likelihood to recommend is certainly worth measuring; CSP uses the NPS® system ourselves. However, this score alone does not tell you enough.

Think of it this way: You wouldn’t use your blood pressure as the sole indicator of your total health, right? It’s important, sure, and it would be convenient if that was all you needed to pay attention to, but it’s not the only vital statistic your doctor needs to track to assess your overall well-being. The same logic applies to customer loyalty.

Instead, what you should aim for is a customer loyalty index that reflects multiple measurement methods and tracks them over time. This allows you to break down the customer relationship into feedback, perceptions, and issue resolutions. Ultimately, you’ll be able to see what you need to do to maintain and increase your loyal customers.

Aim for a full picture of your organization’s brand loyalty.

Measuring customer loyalty in a variety of ways gives you a more comprehensive, multi-dimensional view of your customer loyalty situation. In addition to at-a-glance scores like NPS®, a customer loyalty index can include attitudes and behaviors such as overall satisfaction with customer service, and likelihood of a customer to make a future purchase.

Capturing this data will yield many benefits, among them:

  • Producing a good view of your current standings with the customer,
  • Predicting future retention, and
  • Providing the foundation for building a loyalty profile for your customer.
Closely examine your metrics at the outset.

According to IRI, 44% of Millennials claim to be brand loyal. With their impressive purchasing power, figures like that should motivate you to keep the company-customer relationship at the forefront of your strategic planning.

What do you want your measurements to tell you? Start with the results you want to see to help you decide how to prioritize the data you collect. You will likely find you need more indicators than you thought, but taken together, all these measurements complement one another.

Studying the results of your customer research will produce opportunities to compare your organization against industry standards and your direct competitors, identify your strengths and weaknesses, and zero in on customer preferences. CSP’s Customer Experience Management solutions are designed to provide exactly these opportunities, with the added benefit of guidance from seasoned experts to help you identify what to focus on and what steps to take.


You might also want to read:

Net Promoter, NPS, and the NPS-related emoticons are registered trademarks, and Net Promoter Score and Net Promoter System are service marks, of Bain & Company, Inc., Satmetrix Systems, Inc. and Fred Reichheld.

4 Things a Net Promoter Score℠ (NPS®) Can Do for Your Business

May 31, 2016

Think about a brand you absolutely love. They’ve got a five-star product in your opinion, or you’ve fallen for their fantastic performance, or you’re super happy with how they manage their business. On a scale of 0-10, how likely would you be to recommend that brand’s products or services to a friend? If you answered 9 or 10, you can consider yourself a promoter.

This idea serves as the foundation of the Net Promoter Score℠ (NPS®).

A Net Promoter Score is a way to measure the loyalty between a company and its customers. The measurement comes from a score calculated based on the answer to this question:

On a scale of 0-10, how likely are you to recommend this product/service/company to a friend or colleague?

clipboard showing customer satisfaction scores similar to NPSBased on their answers, customers are categorized into one of the following three groups:

  • Score of 0-6: Detractors. Not likely to recommend. These customers are overall unhappy with your brand and can cause damage through negative word-of-mouth talk.
  • Score of 7-8: Passives. Somewhat likely to recommend. These people don’t hate your brand, but they’re not thrilled with it either. They might easily switch to a competitor; they lack brand loyalty.
  • Score of 9-10. Promoters. Extremely likely to recommend. These respondents love you. They are your repeat customers, and they’ll happily tell others how satisfied they are with you.

To calculate your NPS®, you take the percentage of customers who are promoters minus the percentage who are detractors. You end up with a score between -100 and 100. The higher the score, the more promoters you have, and the better you can infer your business is performing.

According to Bain & Company, which first introduced NPS®, “High scores on this question correlated strongly with repurchases, referrals and other actions that contribute to a company’s growth.” And their case studies show that the NPS® question is tops when it comes to predicting behavior. Therefore, the score is often seen as a good indicator of future growth.

When looking at your NPS®, here are four things your score can tell you:
  1. It can show what your company is doing well. Higher scores often reflect a healthy business. Results can reveal areas of strength that should be maintained or built up even further.
  2. It can uncover what needs to be fixed or improved. A lower score can indicate the need for probing into customer satisfaction or loyalty issues.
  3. It can initiate relationship building. The Net Promoter SystemSM encourages reaching out to customers to address their concerns, leading to one-on-one interactions that can be powerful.
  4. It can help motivate employees. Feedback related to your score can give your team members incentive for making improvements and providing a great customer experience.

Companies in all types of industries are using Net Promoter Score® – from financial to healthcare, tech to retail, and more. CSP is licensed to use the NPS®, as well as other metrics, to help businesses grow loyalty and customer satisfaction. To know more about how we incorporate these powerful analytics into a customer experience strategy, contact CSP with your questions.

 

Net Promoter, NPS, and the NPS-related emoticons are registered trademarks, and Net Promoter Score and Net Promoter System are service marks, of Bain & Company, Inc., Satmetrix Systems, Inc. and Fred Reichheld.

Sources:

http://www.medallia.com/
http://www.netpromotersystem.com/
https://www.netpromoter.com/